22R Engine Rebuild


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Date: Thu, 31 Jul 1997 18:48:35 -0700 (PDT)
From: Michael Henry 
Subject: 22R Rebuild
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

On Tue, 1 Jul 1997, Charles wrote:

> Well, with 200,000 miles on my 22R I believe it's time for a rebuild.
> The motor is now smoking going up almost any hill off-road now. Has 
> anyone rebuilt a 22R recently? If so how much did it cost? should I 
> just get a motor from a junk yard and build the motor the way I want? 
> or would it be cheaper to get an exchange at a local garage?

I just finished rebuilding my 22R last week (well, I got it running
last week), so I can give you an approximation of what the cost will be.
Answer:  it depends.  Do you want to do any modifications?  If so, these
will usually bump up the cost a little.  I got an '85 block, had it gone
through by the machine shop to make sure it wasn't trash, then had the
crank, rods, pistons, flywheel, etc. balanced.  I also had the cylinders
bored 0.030" over.  My end cost for the machine work on the bottom end was
about $800.00.  For the top end I got fuel injected valve springs (better
for the more radical cam) a Downey cam, and then had the head completely
gone through and a valve job done.  Cost with components was about
$500.00.  

I also bought the Downey 32/36 Weber DGEV carb (not recommended)
and installed it on a manifold which I had checked for cracks and trued.
All assembly was done by myself, but all the little trinkets required to
put a new motor together will astound you.  Whatever you budget for
miscellaneous items, double it.  That'll get you closer.  Total cost for
the entire project was, including the high flow exhaust system, was around
$2000.00  Was it worth it?  Well, I haven't even gotten the motor broken
in yet, so I can't tell you yet.  I think it is.  Just for the security in
knowing every stinking bolt on the motor, I think it is worth it.  If I
just wanted a reliable daily runner though, I'd probably just buy a used
motor out of Japan and replace the valve seals.  One of those, properly
maintained will take you 200,000 miles with very little trouble.

Michael Henry
Forestville, CA
henry@sonic.net
'84 Xtra Cab 4X4  
 

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Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 18:45:27 -0700
From: Jim Volkerts 
Subject: help! need an engine!
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

How badly is the engine smoked? If it's rebuildable there are a couple
of places I checked in Sacramento. Engines Only (916-334-6784) Rebuild
$1100, you deliver the engine; if they do everything $1900. Parrish
Automotive (916-334-2777) $1400 and $2350 same deal as above. Both have
a 1 year, 12,000 mile warranty. Parrish also has a machine shop and can
do any extra machine work that you may want.

If you need to replace the engine, the best deal is ATK Engines
(800-345-5566) in Sacramento. $1695 with a 3 year 36,000 mile warranty.
You'll see these engines in the Downey, Northwest Off-Road and
Performance Products catalogs for around $2200 delivered. Their web site
is www.atk-engines.com

Northwest Off-Road (360-676-1200) sells complete engine rebuild kits for
about $600. The kit includes everything, pistons w/pins, rings,
bearings, etc.

LC Engineering in Lake Havasu, Arizona sells performance kits,
everything from individual parts to short blocks, long blocks, and
complete engines. However, their stuff is all high performance and
pretty expensive with a short warranty (90 days). Their number is
520-505-2501. They claim to get 250 hp out of a 22R.

All of the above quotes were for a 22RE engine, the price might be less
for a non fuel injected engine.

I looked into used engines from Japan (Attarco/916-920-2522), but was
told that the 22RE engines were not sold in Japan and so weren't
available. This may or may not be true, but the way I understand it, the
Japanese have to put new engines in their cars after 30,000 miles (smog
laws) and those used engines are shipped over here. You can get great
deals on engines and transmissions. I bought a trans for my Honda and
it's still working great after 100,000 miles.

If you're in Central Cal there is a place in Fresno called All Engine
Dist. (209-266-3474). I think they have a remanufactured engine for a
reasonable price.

Hope this helps. Good Luck!
Jim Volkerts
"There are 3 kinds of people. Those who can count and those who can't."


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Date: Mon, 25 Aug 1997 19:43:42 -0500
From: Chris & Nicki Yorke 
Subject: help! need an engine!
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

. Yea, get real!! BTW 2000 will get you a

> rebuilt from Performance Products with a 3 year, 36,000 mile
> warranty.    new pistons, valves, rings, etc. and Perf. Prod is
> ussually
> priced on the high side. they have a web site, perforanceproducts.com
> Good luck on your quest
> Rob Boyle

The engines that are offerd by Performance are built by a company named
ATK. When we have an engine that has been driven into the ground and
back that is what we try to sell. They seem to be very well built.
Supposedely they are engines from Japan that are gone thru and all
bearings rods  pistons etc replaced. The engines do not usually have a
lot of miles on them when they are brought into the US. They do not want
your old engine back for a core so you dont have to deal with that
hassle. So far we have only had one that had a prblem and it was due to
driver neglect( he drove it with a stuck t-stat until it quit, and had
to have a new head)

Chris
yorke@bellsouth.net

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Date: 25 Aug 1997 09:10:58 -0700
From: "Jay Kopycinski" 
Subject: help! need an engine!
To: "Toyota 4x4 List" 

                      Subject:                              Time:  8:38 AM
  OFFICE MEMO         help! need an engine!                 Date:  8/25/97

Just for a piece of info.....I'm currently rebuilding an '84 22R
for a friend's '79 truck. Here is what I currently have invested
in the rebuild:

Vat block                    $25
Bore/hone block              $50
Grind crank                  $65
Resize one rod               $14
R&R rod pin bushings         $24
Check rods, R&R pistons      $22
Resurface flywheel           $25
Balance engine assy         $100
Clean/bead blast misc. parts $15

This is $340 in machine work. I have not yet had any 
of the head work done yet.

Parts:

Pistons, rings, main bearings, rod bearings, 
thrust washers, oil pump, complete gasket 
kit, pin bushings                             $360

Clutch disc, pp, pilot bearing, 
throwout bearing (Japanese OEM)               $130 

Timing set (Japanese OEM)                      $75        

Water pump (Japanese OEM)                      $35

Misc. (cleaners, paint, plastigauge, etc.)     $32

______________________________________________
Jay Kopycinski                                  '85 Toylet   (ROKTOY)
Gilbert, AZ                                        '91 4Runner (hers) 
ryna10@email.sps.mot.com               '72 Jeep Commando
http://www.netzone.com/~jayk        '97  H-D Sportster
Arizona Lo-Rangers 4WD Club               TLCA #3243
______________________________________________

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Date: Tue, 16 Sep 1997 22:59:35 -0500
From: chris yorke 
Subject: ATK engines.
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

IN response to your question about ATK engines. We use them on a regular
basis for engine jobs that are to expensive to be rebuilt (usually due to
not changing oil). We have put them in everything from Tercel's to Camry's
to Truck's, and have had very good luck with them so far. They do stand
behind their warranty very well. Something we just found out the other day
was that if you have it done you have to have the head or heads retorqued
after 500 miles, if you dont the warranty is void. The only problem we have
had so far with any of their engines was the balance shaft assembly on a
5S-FE Camry engine, it was not shimmed to the correct backlash and they
paid for a replacement from Toyota to fix the problem they had caused. Oh
we have installed probably 20 of these engines in the 2 1/2 years that I
have worked for the dealer. They are pricey but it is sorta the same as
buying a Toyota in the first place I think, You get what you pay for.

My .02 worth
Chris Yorke 
yorke1@mcione.com
86 longbed
competition cam 
otherwise stock 

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Date: Fri, 17 Oct 1997 09:06:44 -0700
From: "Baltzly, Michael R(C05422)" 
Subject: overhaul time
To: "'Toy4x4@tlca.org'" 

James Brink wrote:
>
>> Just when IS overhaul time on the venerable 22RE engines?
>>
>> I just turned 250K - and besides an annoying oil leak past the main 
>> seal (worn main bearings I guess) just *when* can I plan on having 
>> to do a overhaul  :)
>
>I suppose when you have to resort to a "constant-loss" oiling system
>with and underhood reservior (a la Previa) to keep the crankcase 
>full, it is time for at least a ring and valve job... (oh, and valve 
>seals too) :-)

Has anyone had any success with just replacing the rings, without 
pulling the engine to bore the cylinders?

I am at the point of adding a quart of oil with every tank of gas. 
 The rings must be the cause because there are no leaks and I rebuilt 
the head (and replaced the timing set) 9 months ago.  My cylinders 
were smooth, with crosshatch showing and no significant ridge.  I 
don't want to pull the engine because I do not have the equipment and 
it sounds like too big of a job for me.  I am not expecting a miracle 
from replacing the rings, but if I could get the oil consumption down 
to a quart per 1000 miles it would be a big improvement.

Mike

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Date: Mon, 20 Oct 1997 09:32:28 -0700
From: Brandon Miller 
Subject: overhaul time
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

> Has anyone had any success with just replacing the rings, without 
> pulling the engine to bore the cylinders?

Yes, I have.  The only reason you would have to bore the engine is if
the cylinders are worn beyond spec and new rings wouldn't help then,
you'd need to bore the cylinder walls and put in oversize rings. 
Otherwise hone the cylinders to get the crosshatch pattern and throw in
some new rings.  There is no need to pull the engine, in fact it would
be a lot harder if you did.  Be sure to cover the crank with a rag so
metal shavings get on it.  That is a lot of oil to be losing, are your
main seals leaking?  
- -- 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Brandon Miller                     email: sac78483@saclink.csus.edu
Sacramento, CA                            millerb@gaia.ecs.csus.edu
               
                             url:
http://gaia.ecs.csus.edu/~millerb                   
TLCA #6013
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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Date: Mon, 20 Oct 1997 11:13:58 -0700 (PDT)
From: Luke P Miller 
Subject: overhaul time
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

On Mon, 20 Oct 1997, Brandon Miller wrote:

> > Has anyone had any success with just replacing the rings, without 
> > pulling the engine to bore the cylinders?

I also replaced my rings without removing the engine. This was a solid
axle 4Runner, so working underneath the engine was fairly easy. You can
replace your main bearings and rod bearings at the same time. For the main
bearings I removed one cap, pushed the top half of the bearing out very
carefully to avoid scratching anything (it will just slide around the
shaft and drop out into your hand). Replacing them is the opposite
procedure, just place the top half bearing against the crankshaft, and
slide it into place above the shaft. So you can do plenty without pulling
the engine.

 
Luke Miller
'85 4Runner

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Date: Fri, 07 Nov 1997 23:17:37 -0800
From: James Brink 
Subject: inframe fun
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

jmortier wrote:
> 
>  Well, the old beast ( '86 22re ifs ; 330,000km) needs some engine work. Low
> oil pressure, and a slightly noisy bottom end are getting irritating during
> my daily commute. None of my manuals (Mitchell, Chilton, Haynes) deal
> specifically with the removal of the oil pan in an IFS truck. I suspect that
> for 3.9 hour labor it might be an ugly pan to re/re. Has anyone sweated over
> this one?( Scott, ED, Jack?) Does the engine need to be raised? Aprox how high?
>  Any thoughts on OEM vs. jobber bearings, oil pumps?

When properly equipped (engine hoist and stand) you could probably have
the motor out of the truck in less than the 3.9 hours it takes to do the
pan/pick-up and gasket. This approach is much easier on the individual
performing the work (you) and is much safer when checking oil clearance
on bearings or even reinstalling the oil pan properly to prevent leaks.

If you wish to do it in chassis, the motor has to come up quite a bit.
Unbolt the motor mounts and raise the engine by the transmission. Check
your hoses and fan clearance between the radiator when doing this. Watch
the distance between the bellhousing/valve cover and firewall as well.


- --
Jim Brink--Toyota/ASE Certified Technician             '86 Std. Bed 22R
Manhattan Beach, CA				   32x11.50/15 BFG M/Ts
brinkjm@earthlink.net     	
************************************************************************
TLCA# 6184/ Friends of the Mojave Road (FOMR)

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Date: Sat, 08 Nov 1997 08:22:01 -0800
From: Brandon Miller 
Subject: inframe fun
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

> 
> If you wish to do it in chassis, the motor has to come up quite a bit.

Why?  I have rebuilt my engine with it still bolted in the mounts, did
the complete overhaul- new rings, pistons, bearings, timing kit, head
machine work, cam, etc. in one day, solo too.  I can't see why anyone
would want to take out the engine unless it is cracked (been there) or
you are bringing it in to the machine shop to have it bored over. Take
the radiator out instead of the engine, and take the intake off as one
piece.  
- -- 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Brandon Miller                     email: sac78483@saclink.csus.edu
Sacramento, CA                            millerb@gaia.ecs.csus.edu
               
                             url:
http://gaia.ecs.csus.edu/~millerb                   
TLCA #6013
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

------------------------------

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Date: Sat, 08 Nov 1997 19:37:03 -0800
From: James Brink 
Subject: inframe fun
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

Brandon Miller wrote:
> Why?  I have rebuilt my engine with it still bolted in the mounts, did
> the complete overhaul

Why? Because in this particular circumstance we are talking about an IFS
equipped truck, not a lifted live axle. Have you ever attempted to
remove the oil pan on an IFS truck without lifing the engine/trans.
some?

I guess I must be spoiled but if you perfom enough engine r&r
operations, working with the engine on a stand is far easier than
in-chassis work, IMHO.

For some Toyota vehicles, labor to replace an oil pan gasket pays up to
5 hours in-chassis ('92 Supra, Celica All-Trac, V6 Trucks, etc.). For an
experienced technician who knows some shortcuts, engine r&r and oil pan
replacement may be accomplished in half the book time.

Again, just my $.0025 worth...

- --
Jim Brink--Toyota/ASE Certified Technician             '86 Std. Bed 22R
Manhattan Beach, CA				   32x11.50/15 BFG M/Ts
brinkjm@earthlink.net     	
************************************************************************
TLCA# 6184/ Friends of the Mojave Road (FOMR)

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Date: Wed, 03 Dec 1997 20:50:44 -0800
From: James Brink 
Subject: Rebuilding My 22R
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

Eli Madden wrote:

> 
> I am rebuilding my 1987 22R
> It is in my 1983 4wd SR5 Shortbed Pickup with 189k
> It supposedly only has about 75k on it but I am not so sure anymore
> It was smoking and then broke the timing chain
> 
> I am going to replace the timing chain and tensioners and guides
> rings and bearings valve seals
> I plan to put in a cam in the near future but I do not have the money
> right now
> 
> Now on to my questions
> 
> Should I replace the valves

Only if any of them are damaged or burnt.

> How do I know if they got wacked by the pistons

Oh, you'll know once you have them out of the head :-)

> Will a gasket set for a 1983 22R work in this 1987 22R

No, the intake and exhaust ports are shaped differently so these gaskets
will not work. Also, late 22Rs do not use an oil pan gasket.

> What else should I replace

Oil pump, water pump if you can afford it. Look closely at the rocker
arms an shafts and give them a thourough cleaning.

> What are good sources for parts

Several suppliers have engine kits for the 22R. It is a very popular
engine. Shop around and ask at the parts stores. Go with quality parts
supplied by Sealed Power or TRW if you choose to go aftermarket. Oh, and
of course, the Toyota dealer too...(No flames please).

> I am planning to keep the block in the vehicle is this a mistake

All depends on how you want to go about the repairs. Personally, I've
had enough laying on my back having oil dripped on my face. I prefer to
pull the motor but others on the list have had good luck doing
in-chassis overhauls.

> Any tips or tricks would be greatly appreciated

Keep your work area clean and bag and mark the parts as you disassemble
the engine. Do tha same (marking) the location connections for vacuum
lines too. This will make things easier when reassembling the engine.


- --
Jim Brink--Toyota/ASE Certified Technician             '86 Std. Bed 22R
Manhattan Beach, CA				   32x11.50/15 BFG M/Ts
brinkjm@earthlink.net     	
************************************************************************
TLCA# 6184/ Friends of the Mojave Road (FOMR)

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Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 16:08:52 -0800 (PST)
From: rtupman@uky.campus.mci.net
Subject: 22r rings and bearings
To: toy4x4@tlca.org

My 81 SR5 22r longbed burns 1.5 quarts of oil per tank of gas. It has no
leaks and Ok compression.  What kind of success should I have from a in
frame replacement of the rings and rod bearings?  JC whitney sells a kit
that includes gaskets rings and bearing for aprox $110, any thoughts?  I've
already replaced the valve stem seals, should anything else be done during
the minor rebuild?  Thanks to everyone on the list for all of the insight
and helpful information.

------------------------------

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Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 11:05:09 -0700
From: "Baltzly, Michael R(C05422)" 
Subject: 22r rings and bearings
To: "'Toy4x4@tlca.org'" 

By some weird coincidence I just got done replacing the rings and rod 
bearings on my 85 last night.  It was using about the same amount of 
oil yours, also appeared to be in good shape otherwise, and had a 
valve job about a year ago that didn't help the oil consumpution.  I 
worked carefully and it took me about 16 hours total.  Once you get 
everything disassembled, the actual replacement of the rings is a 
snap.  There is no problem accessing the bottom end on a live-axle 
truck.

After 225,000 miles my old bearings looked like new, and there was 
crosshatch showing in the cylinders.  There was so little ridge in the 
cylinders that I did not bother to remove it and the pistons slid in 
easily with the new rings.

I only had a chance to drive a few miles since I got done.  I will 
give a better report after I make sure that everything is holding 
together.

Mike

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Date: Wed, 25 Feb 1998 19:26:33 -0800
From: Jim Brink 
Subject: Reusing Head Bolts
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

Eli Madden wrote:
> 
> I just did a bunch of engine work and I was wondering
> what people think about re-using head bolts. The engine
> is over 10 years old ('87 22R) and as far as I know these
> are the original bolts. New ones will be close to $50 at the
> local rip-off dealer.......
>

22R head bolts are reusable as long as the threads and underside of the
heads are not damaged.

Use a little anti-sieze on the threads and oil under the bolt heads
before installation.

- -- 

Jim Brink, Toyota/ASE Certified Technician	1986 Toyota Std. Bed 4WD

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Date: Mon, 05 Jan 1998 20:59:55 -0800
From: Jim Brink 
Subject: Used (low mi) engine source?
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

Scott Rowin wrote:
> 
>I heard about a place that sells low milage Japanese engines.. whats
> the name (and possibly phone #) to them?

Is it K. Watanabe Corp. in Lynwood, CA?

(310) 763-6420.
- --
Jim Brink--Toyota/ASE Certified Technician             '86 Std. Bed 22R
Manhattan Beach, CA				   32x11.50/15 BFG M/Ts
ToyTech@off-road.com                       	
************************************************************************
TLCA# 6184/ Friends of the Mojave Road (FOMR)

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Date: Wed, 25 Feb 1998 19:29:48 -0800
From: Jim Brink 
Subject: 22R Headgasket Replacement
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

Eli Madden wrote:
> 
> Hi folks, me again.
> I was wondering what people recommend for gasket cement on
> headgasket of a 22R.....and any other tips for installing one.

Use black or grey RTV only on the forward portion of the gasket where it
seals the timing cover.

Removal and installation of the head is much easier with the manifolds
installed as it gives you and an assistant something to hold on to.
Having a third person around helps to wiggle the timing chain up through
the head during installation.

An engine hoist makes it a one-person job.

- -- 

Jim Brink, Toyota/ASE Certified Technician	1986 Toyota Std. Bed 4WD
Manhattan Beach, CA				32x11.50/15 BFG M/Ts
ToyTech@Off-Road.com
************************************************************************
TLCA - Friends of the Mojave Road (FOMR) - CA4WDC

Visit http://www.off-road.com Putting Off-Road, Online!

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Date: Mon, 16 Mar 1998 18:47:18 -0700
From: "Baltzly, Michael R(C05422)" 
Subject: bearings and rings
To: "'Toy4x4@tlca.org'" 

>A month ago someone posted that they were going to install rings and rod
>bearings while the block remained in the truck.  Please let us know how
>successful your efforts were, i.e.  oil consumption, power increase etc.

I replaced my rings and rod bearings around the end of January.  I 
only have about 1100 miles since then and I was going to wait a little 
longer to get a better feel for the oil consumption, but I can tell 
you how things have gone so far.

My truck is a carbureted 1985 longbed, 209,000 miles, completely 
stock.  It was burning around 2 quarts of oil per tank of gas.  When I 
floored the gas pedal to enter a freeway I could see a huge blue cloud 
in my rearview mirror.  My oil got black 2 miles after it was changed. 
 I bought 20-50 oil by the case at Costco.  Other than that, the 
engine ran fairly well.  When I replaced the rings I filled the 
crankcase up with 20-50 and had burned about 1/4 quart after 500 
miles.  At that point I had the oil changed with 10-30 and I have not 
burned a noticeable amount in 600 miles.  It is hard to read the 
dipstick when the oil is hot because it has stayed clear rather than 
get black.  I don't put out any blue clouds, and I can feel real 
compression holding me back when I let off on the throttle.  Power is 
up noticably.  I think that the operation was a success.


Notes on replacing rings
- --------------------------------
First, let me say that I am not a top banana mechanic compared to many 
people on this list, so please feel free to correct me.  Second, sorry 
about the length of this post.

|From what I have seen and heard, when 22R engines are burning 
significant amounts of oil it is always coming through the rings. 
 Some other engine families have problems with valves or valve seals, 
but you are kidding yourself if you think that your 22R's heavy oil 
consumption is going to be helped by a valve job.  The best solution 
is to remove the engine from the truck and have it bored, measured, 
and rebuilt to perfection.  Another alternative is to just replace the 
rings.  This is a lot cheaper, and also a lot easier if you don't have 
a crane and an engine stand.  Of course, if the engine is in bad 
shape--like if it has been run without oil or water--then simply 
replacing the rings won't help much.  I have owned my truck since new, 
so I knew that it hadn't been abused.

The parts that I bought were:
Hastings moly rings		$48
Clevite 77 rod bearings		$15
Felpro gasket set		$80

The only tools needed are basic wrenches and a torque wrench, which I 
had, and a ring compressor, which I borrowed from Pep Boys.

I think that the hardest part of the job is removing the head.  At 
least that is part that is mostly likely to throw your back out.  I 
didn't have a hoist or any help to lift the head, and I was barely 
able to manhandle it.  I had to take the exhaust manifold off first to 
lessen the weight.  It is essentially impossible to remove the intake 
manifold while the head is in the truck because there are studs along 
the bottom that are inaccessible.  Some things that I wished that I 
had known:

*  There are two AIR pipes on the exhaust manifold that wrap around 
the back of the head.  You need to loosen the bolts on these pipes 
under the INTAKE manifold to get enough slack to be able to take the 
pipes off the exhaust manifold.

*  There is a bracket for a heater pipe that is bolted to the back of 
head and must be loosened.

*  Number all connections, then video tape your engine compartment 
before taking things apart.

*  After you think that you have removed everything from the intake 
manifold, you will discover two large hoses that connect to the very 
bottom.

*  Pull straight up on the head or you will break the plastic timing 
chain guides.

I found that the only way that I could lift the head off is by 
standing in the engine compartment in front of the engine, where the 
radiator usually goes.  I am 5'10", 155 pounds and I barely fit.  If 
you are much bigger you can probably deadlift the weight of a 22R head 
even while reaching across the grill, so you may have an easier time 
than me.

Now that the head is off, check out how the cylinders look.  You 
should be able to see crosshatching still in the bores.  Look 
especially at how much of a ridge there is at the top of the cylinder 
bores.  If the ridges are very big then you will need to remove them 
before you can push the pistons out the top.  I had so little ridge 
that I just took a piece of 600-grit emery paper on my fingers and 
wiped it around a couple of times to get rid of the carbon buildup. 
 If your bores have major ridges then I doubt if just replacing the 
rings will do much good--time to think about pulling the engine to 
have it bored.

Once you have the head off, dropping the oil pan and removing the 
pistons is easy on a live axle truck.  The oil pan is a tight fit next 
to the front differential, so you need to lift the engine a couple of 
inches relative to the axle to get it off.  The manual talks about 
unbolting the motor mounts and jacking up the transmission, however I 
found it easier to leave everything together and jack up the frame on 
the passenger's (short) side to get the clearance.  If you have a lift 
you probably don't need to worry about this.  I have never looked into 
how hard it is to remove the oil pan on an IFS truck.  Once the pan is 
off, you will be looking right at the big ends of the rods.  If the 
timing mark is at TDC then the rods for cylinders 2 and 3 will be 
hanging down where you can get at them easily.  I removed and replaced 
the pistons one at a time.  They are not numbered, and you don't want 
to get them mixed up.  Just unbolt the rod bearing cap and push up on 
the rod until the piston pops out the top.  Then take the old rings 
off the piston, clean off all of the carbon, check the piston and rod 
for unusual wear, and put on your new rings.  I had a ring expander, 
but I found that I could do a better job by carefully spreading the 
rings with my thumbs.  Snap new bearing halves into the rod and cap, 
oil up the cylinder bore and piston, then use your ring compressor and 
a hammer handle to tap the piston (with the mark toward the front) 
into the bore.  Be careful and don't force the rings.  If they don't 
want to start then compress them again and try to line the compressor 
up better next time.  After the piston is started down the bore, you 
will be best advised to crawl under the truck and pull the rod the 
rest of the way to seat it on the crank.  You don't want to bang the 
rod or rod bolt into the crank and nick it.  Use some oil or assembly 
lube on the rod bearings so they aren't dry on the crank.  Put the cap 
on the rod with the mark facing the front, and torque it down.  Then 
swing the engine around for at least one revolution to make sure that 
nothing is binding.  Do this same procedure to the other 3 pistons, 
then turn the engine over a few times by hand and check the torque on 
the rod bolts again.

If you ever had any thoughts of replacing your timing components you 
will never get a better chance to take the front cover off than now, 
when the head and oil pan are already off.

This would also be a good time to send your head off for a valve job.

Put everything back together in the reverse order that you took it 
apart and fill it up with fluids.  I used the cork/rubber oil pan 
gasket that came in my Felpro set.  I had genuine Toyota FIPG material 
(and plenty of silicone) but the gasket seemed like an easier and less 
messy solution.  It hasn't leaked yet.  Try to get everything hooked 
up and timed well enough so that the engine will start quickly and 
keep running.  You want to get oil pressure right away to the new 
bearings.  The engine may seem a little rough at first, but will 
smooth out quite a bit within a few miles.  The package of rings had 
some break-in instructions that said to drive in top gear at 35 mph, 
then floor it until 50 mph and repeat 10 times, then drive normally. 

Good luck.

Mike

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1993 18:45:01 -0800
From: Ken Emanuel 
Subject: bearings and rings
To: Toy4x4@tlca.org

Baltzly, Michael R(C05422) wrote:

>  Some other engine families have problems with valves or valve seals,
> but you are kidding yourself if you think that your 22R's heavy oil
> consumption is going to be helped by a valve job.  

I've seen quite the contrary.  Valve seals are often the source of
burning oil on Hondas and Toyotas.  Especially ones that have sat for
months on end without running.  A simple valve seal job on a
decent-to-well maintained Honda or Toyota at about the 180-200,000 mile
interval will often keep the vehicle running great for another
100-150,000 miles.

*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
Ken Emanuel                     Emanuel@csus.edu
'87 Xtra Cab SR5    (22R-E)
http://webpages.csus.edu/~sac75830/toystuff.htm
*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 16 Mar 1998 22:49:16 -0800
From: "Jay Biery" 
Subject: bearings and rings
To: 

It may not be necessary to have your crank turned.  I'd measure it first. 
I am doing a frame up restoration of my 85 22R-E.  It has 152,000 miles on
it.  Since I bought the truck used with 120,000 miles on it, I had no idead
how the truck was cared for over the years.  Therefor, I decided to rebuild
the motor.  To my surprise the motor had little to no wear.  All crank,
rod, and every other engine part was pristine.  The only thing I needed to
do was rings.  The cylinders were fine too!.  I am impressed.  Make sure
you get the correct rod and crank bearings because there are several sizes
offered.

Also, I have rebuilt a nissan engine with the motor still in the chassis. 
It was not the easiest thing, but it worked.

~Jay    85 SR5 Extended  

------------------------------
----------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Mar 1998 10:04:49 -0500 (EST)
From: Eli Madden 
Subject: Engine Rebuilding Tips
To: toy4x4@tlca.org

Mike did a very nice write-up on his rebuild. I have a few things I'd like
to add.

> It is essentially impossible to remove the intake 
>manifold while the head is in the truck because there are studs along 
>the bottom that are inaccessible.

I was able to get to these with a little swearing. Then I just put the
intake manifold to the side with everything still connected to it (except
the head of course). I think this is the easiest route, though it is a
pain. With the intake manifold disconnected, it was fairly easy to lift
the head off the engine, standing on the ground in front of the truck. Of
course, I am 6'4" and 210 lbs, a gorilla doing a 5 banana job! :)

>The oil pan is a tight fit next 
>to the front differential, so you need to lift the engine a couple of 
>inches relative to the axle to get it off. 

I have a 3" lift and it was easy.

> After the piston is started down the bore, you 
>will be best advised to crawl under the truck and pull the rod the 
>rest of the way to seat it on the crank.  You don't want to bang the 
>rod or rod bolt into the crank and nick it.

My dad loaned me these little rubber nipple thingies that went on the rod
bearing bolts to prevent this when I was putting them in.

>If you ever had any thoughts of replacing your timing components you 
>will never get a better chance to take the front cover off than now, 
>when the head and oil pan are already off.

My timing chain had broken, so I put in a new complete kit. I first tried
a kit for an '83-'84, the guides are a little different and the chain was
too long. I bought a new kit for my '87 22R and it was fine.

>I used the cork/rubber oil pan 
>gasket that came in my Felpro set.  I had genuine Toyota FIPG material 
>(and plenty of silicone) but the gasket seemed like an easier and less 
>messy solution. 

I used silicone in addition to the gasket and it was a PAIN and I'm not so
sure about the seal. I'll just use the gasket by itself next time.


Other things to note-
 When I was installing the headgasket, one of my manuals said to
put silicone around the oil passages, but Jim Brink said to just use it on
the timing cover area, which I did. I'm getting a little oil leak in the
timing cover area, so I'm gonna have to do it again. 

 I also replaced my valve seals, lapped the valves, and hones the
cylinders.

 Feel free to e-mail me with questions.


Eli Madden
Middlebury, Vermont
'83 SR5 Standard Bed 4x4 w/ '87 22R and 31s
eli@computeralt.com 

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 18 Mar 1998 07:54:10 -0800
From: "Brandon Miller" 
Subject: Engine Rebuilding Tips
To: 

I just have to add that I have taken off my head-on the engine ;)
many times and the best way for me has been to leave the intake attached,
saves time and effort, not to mention gaskets.  I didn't think it was that
heavy but maybe it was my method.  I unbolted the exhaus and made sure all
the hoses, wire, etc. were disconnected then I placed a stool right in fron
of the truck.  I picked up the head and intake and moved it on to the stool
so that I could get in a better position to move it to the ground.  The only
problem is all the fluid and oil, etc that get's all over you.  Still, I
would much rather do that than go through the pain of unbolting the intake.

Of course if you plan of having the head machined you'll need to take it off
anyway.  As far as the rest goes, I just put a towl at the bottom of the
cylinders to stop any metal from getting on the crank after I removed the
pistons, then honed the cylinders to get the cross hatch pattern, put in new
rod bearings and a new head gasket and wallah!  It is a good time to change
the timing components too.


----------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Mar 1998 17:37:51 -0800
From: Jim Brink 
Subject: toy4x4: Re: Engine Rebuilding Tips

Scott Muir wrote:

> 
> Someone yonks ago mentioned that when they had their block bored, they paid an
> extra $80 or something to get the engine balanced...  What does this entail?

This ensures that all rotating parts of the engine are balaced to one
another, to put it in simple terms.

> How much of your engine do you
> have to bring to the shop to get this done?

Crank, rods, pistons and pins, flywheel or flexplate, clutch assembly,
crank pulley.

> 
> If you are going to get the block bored and replace the pistons, does the block
> get bored, measured and then you have to order the pistons??

You specify or the machine shop will recommend the amount to be machined
and the appropriate piston/ring size. In some cases, motors that have
been machined once can only be overbored so far. In other cases, due to
damage, the cylinder bores will have to be bored quite high over
standard. It all depends on the condition of the cylinders.

> 
> Lastly, what all should be replaced?  Pistons, crank bearings, con-rod shells...
> anything else?? (I think I'd skip the crank seals cause they are new as of last
> august) I did everything BUT the bottom end last year.

Pistons (if overbored), rings, piston pins, rod and main bearings, oil
pump, timing chain, seals (they are so cheap anyways). For a
super-reliable overhaul, have the rods checked for straightness and
truness in the pin and crank areas too.


- -- 

Jim Brink, Toyota/ASE Certified Technician	1986 Toyota Std. Bed 4WD
Manhattan Beach, CA				32x11.50/15 BFG M/Ts
ToyTech@Off-Road.com
************************************************************************
TLCA - Friends of the Mojave Road (FOMR) - CA4WDC

Visit http://www.off-road.com Putting Off-Road, Online!

============================================================================
Toyota 4x4 page: http://www.off-road.com/4x4web/toyota

------------------------------


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 19 Mar 1998 18:31:05 +0200
From: "Barry Miller" 
Subject: re replacing Main bearings in place

re replacing Main bearings in place

This is easy to do by just dropping the sump.

Loosen all the bearing caps a few turns and then one at a time take each 
cap off. the top half of the bearing shell  can easily be pushed around 
the crank until it falls out. It normally needs a tap with a blunt screw 
driver to start it moving.

Be careful, obviously there is a tab on one side of the bearing and the 
other side must be pushed . 

I have done this on several vehicles with no difficulty.


Barry
Barry Miller
PO Box 4172, Durban .South Africa . 4000
Fax +27 <31> 833-202
alias bmiller@iaccess.za
alias bmiller@iafrica.com
Cellphone <082>967-1998

============================================================================
------------------------------

Date: Thu, 19 Mar 1998 16:53:06 -0800 (PST)
From: Luke P Miller 
Subject: Re: re replacing Main bearings in place

No, Mr. Miller is correct. You can replace the main bearings in this
manner. Rod bearings should work by the same method, though usually
you've already pulled the head and yanked the pistons and rods out.

On Fri, 20 Mar 1998, Brandon Miller wrote:

> those are rod bearings........

---------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 20 Mar 1998 18:56:15 -0800
From: "Brandon Miller" 
Subject: Re: re replacing Main bearings in place

oh, you can replace the rod bearings without removing the head, I thought
that was what you were talking about, unbolting the cap and sliding the
bearings around.


--------------------------
------------------------------

Date: Sun, 17 May 1998 12:07:14 -0700
From: "jskaggs" 
Subject: Re: LC Engines

>Hey Folks,
>
>Looking for any input on LC Engineering engines.  I've got an '85 Xcab with
>a perty worn motor, so I'm looking to just totally swap it out with a new
>22r (i'm no mechanic).  My main goal is dependability but I also want to be
>able to keep up with traffic here in the Colorado mtn passes, so I want to
>have a bit more performance than stock.  Any input on LC or any other
'outta
>the box' engines would be greatly appreciated.
>
>Thanks again !
>Craig
>bearclaw@pcisys.com


Hey Craig,

    I just bought a L.C. Engineering engine about 5000 miles ago.  I bought
the street performer engine, their lowest performance engine.  I bought the
engine hoping not to get stuck with a bad deal,  because I hate spending
alot of money and not getting anything for it!  I installed the engine in
Arizona while I was there on vacation.  At the same time I also installed a
Rev Limiting Tach from Mallory, so that I was sure not to over rev the
engine during break-in.  This engine was babied for the first 600 miles.
After the break-in period and my vacation was over I drove it to
Mississippi.  I was not impressed with the power at all.  It was a little
better but I would have expected as much as that from a stock rebuild.
Anyway, after I was in MS a few weeks the engine started idling pretty rough
so I took it to Toyota to find out what was wrong.  They did a compression
test and found that the #2 cylinder was 50 psi. off from the others and then
they squirted oil in the cylinder and the comp. was normal across the board.
We then assumed it was the rings, but you just can't tell until you get it
apart.  I then called LC and told them about the situation. They told me I
could either have Toyota fix it or pull out the motor and ship it to them.
I priced both scenarios and they were both about the same cost, but we
didn't know if the cylinder had any damage or not.  So I opted to have
Toyota pull the motor and I shipped it back to LC.  LC told me that the
rings had glazed over and that they would rebuild the motor.  BUT that is
all they did.  I had to pay for Toyota to pull the motor and I had to pay
for the shipping!  That cost me an extra $750.00 to pull it plus $200 each
way for shipping plus the gaskets that can't be reused.  Total that great LC
motor cost me an extra $1100.00 on top of the price I paid for the motor.
It's not only the money because it would have been a pain in the ass even if
I would have done the pulling of the motor myself.  I didn't do it because I
lived in an apartment and I didn't have my tools with me.  BUT that is not
the end of this story!!  I broke-in the new motor the same way while I was
in MS and then I went back to AZ.  While in AZ I installed an oil pressure
gauge.  After installing the gauge I found out that the motor was pumping
way to much oil pressure 120psi+ don't know for sure because the gauge maxed
out (it actually burst the sending unit that screws into the block).  I am
surprised that it didn't explode the oil filter!  So I called LC and they
told me I could bring it to their shop.  They fiddled with it trying to get
the pressure relief valve to work, but it just wouldn't work.  So they gave
me a new oil pump and said that they didn't have time to install it and said
that I would have to do it.  It was an easy enough job and it worked.  BUT
this is not what I expected to get out of my hard earned dollars!!! I
expected it to work right the first time without any trouble and I expected
better performance from a so called performance engine.  I hate having to do
a job twice for someone else's mistakes and having to pay for it on top of
that.  I also hate spending hard earned money and not getting a good
reliable product!!!!!

    I hope that this word of mouth advertisement costs LC as much or more
than it cost me to put up with all of their crap!!

Supplier: LC Engineering, Lake Havasu City, AZ
Price: 22RE Long Block: $2595.00, EFI Header Kit: $276.75
Unexpected Extras Estimate: $1250.00
Total: $4121.75

If I had to do it over again I would go with a swap 4.3 V6 or a V8.  I
believe the headaches would have been about the same or less!!!


Sorry the reply was so long but I hope this helps keep others from making
the same mistakes I did.

John Skaggs
TLCA# 5560
Visalia, CA
thunder90@msn.com


------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 17 May 1998 22:04:45 -0500
From: Michael Woodruff 
Subject: LC engineering

   Well...........I've had good luck with them.  I have to admit I was
suprised, I usually end up with a scenario like John's (murphy's law and all)
  Granted I have not bought a motor, rather several hundred dollars worth of
22re mods.  Customer service, shipping, etc. was all groovie......they don't
seem to be bothered by lots of tech question's.  They do have several motors
available (all 22r and re variants) the skies the limit $$$$$.  The motor
that John purchased IS suppose to have more power than stock....but it's
still no power horse.  They do have some powerful 22r's, stroker's, and
more.  Personally I'd rather have the tweaked toyota mill with lower gears
than a transplant.

------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 15 Apr 1998 08:59:26 -0700
From: Barney McNamara 
Subject: 22R Engine rebuild

I have started a summer project, rebuilding a 22R core for my
truck. I have added a few pictures to my web pages, and I plan
to keep it updated.

http://www.scruz.net/~barneym/eng_rbld.htm

I decided to go with a 4 banger, rather than a V-6 swap
because this is my daily driver and I can't afford to have it
out of operation for the extended period I figured it would take
me to do all the mounting and adapter mods that the bigger engine
would require, not to mention the $1000 I spent last summer adding
A/C to the existing engine. So I bought an 85 core with 170,000 
miles and bad compression in one cylinder from Dan for $100.

I have started tearing it down, and have found that nothing looks 
to have any huge holes. The cylinders look like they still have
cross-hatch and no ridge at the top, just a smooth ring around the
very top. The head visibly looks OK, but of course I need to pull
valves, and have it all checked out.

I am thinking of the 20R head swap. Has anyone done this in 
California and managed to get enough of the smog stuff back on to 
get it past the inspectors? I would like to keep it legal, but also
want to add a little performance, without spending too much money.
The '85 22R intake manifold looks a lot like the '83, with just a few
differences in details on the smog VSV's, BSVS's, and BFDSV's. So
I think I can build it up with the existing head and manifold, then 
move over the '83 parts when swap day comes around.

I am also planning to add a low-RPM torque CAM - I think Downey sells
one, and new rocker arms to go with it. I also want to put in the LC
Eng variable cam timing sprocket, and get that dialed in. These two
may not be strictly legal, but from what I have picked up, they should
not be detectable at the tailpipe. The final power upgrade is the 
Downey header, also smog legal.

Any ideas or comments out there?
______________________________________________________________
Barney McNamara              JENNY - 83 Toyota Short Bed  
( barney@flowpoint.com )     stock 22R motor ; 3" body lift
Santa Cruz, Ca.              8" alloy rims; 31" BFG A/Ts
homepage: http://www.scruz.net/~barneym/barnhome.htm
______________________________________________________________



------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 9 Jun 1998 10:58:19 -0700
From: "Adam Jenn" 
Subject: re:4runner rebuild

Laura,here are some ideas on the engine rebuild:use a  cam cut from stock
billet as it does not exhibit a lot of the noise associated with cam which
grind down ther base circle to change lift and duration.Piston slap is very
common in the 22re motor due to ts short skirted pistons,index boring will
help this condition greatly.I recommend the TRD smog legal cam with a
Downey header,I've used and tested a great many headers and found the
Downey unit will provide the best bottom end HP and is very easy to setup
due to the 02 sensor location.Be sure to use new rockers when doing a cam
and I also used the late model rocker shafts as they have more oiling holes
per rocker.Also be sure to use a genuine toyota timing chain tensioner.Let
me know if you want full rebuild details.I can also send Dyno results on my
85 4runner 22re build to anyone on the list who is interested.
Ray

============================================================================
Toyota 4x4 page: http://www.off-road.com/4x4web/toyota

------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 9 Jun 1998 10:58:19 -0700
From: "Adam Jenn" 
Subject: re:4runner rebuild

Laura,here are some ideas on the engine rebuild:use a  cam cut from stock
billet as it does not exhibit a lot of the noise associated with cam which
grind down ther base circle to change lift and duration.Piston slap is very
common in the 22re motor due to ts short skirted pistons,index boring will
help this condition greatly.I recommend the TRD smog legal cam with a
Downey header,I've used and tested a great many headers and found the
Downey unit will provide the best bottom end HP and is very easy to setup
due to the 02 sensor location.Be sure to use new rockers when doing a cam
and I also used the late model rocker shafts as they have more oiling holes
per rocker.Also be sure to use a genuine toyota timing chain tensioner.Let
me know if you want full rebuild details.I can also send Dyno results on my
85 4runner 22re build to anyone on the list who is interested.
Ray

============================================================================
Toyota 4x4 page: http://www.off-road.com/4x4web/toyota

------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 12 Jul 1998 23:45:58 -0700
From: Jim Brink 
Subject: Re: LC engineering header install

DRM033@aol.com wrote:
> 
> well, I have the header in, but not bolted up yet.  Luckily every nut came off
> without a problem.  One stud had been broken for a while, but it came out
> easily too.  I was a little mad that LC included all the gaskets except the
> ones for the tube that bolts on over the manifold.  I would guess this is
> something with the emissions equipment.
 
> So, off to the Toy dealer first thing Monday morning to order all the
> necessary gaskets.  Will I need anything to go with the gaskets, sush as some
> kind of FIPG?

Nope, just install them dry. The factory exhaust gaskets are first-rate.
Use a little anti-sieze on the bolts/nuts.

- -- 

Jim Brink     Toyota/ASE Certified Technician     toytech@off-road.com
Manhattan Beach, CA                  http://www.off-road.com/~toytech/
**********************************************************************
                        1986 Toyota Standard Bed 4WD
         22R - 32x11.50/15 BFG M/T - 4.88s- Downey LSD - EZ Locker
**********************************************************************                                             
             TLCA  -  Friends of the Mojave Road  -  CA4WDC

============================================================================
Toyota 4x4 page: http://www.off-road.com/4x4web/toyota

------------------------------
------------------------------

Date: Fri, 15 May 1998 17:27:26 -0700
From: Jim Brink 
Subject: Re: Clutch Woes!

Ed.Wong@astramerck.com wrote:




> I wanted to get a set of main bearings, but it seems that they are
> sized specific to the engine - so I gotta get the numbers
> off the block and rods in order to get new bearings...
> 
> LC sez that the Yota bearings were sized out to 0.000x (versus
> the normal 0.00x) sizes - hence the wacky need for sizing.
> 
> Is this true? Or can I just slip in a set of std bearings and call
> it a (long) day?

Yep but it is rare that you'll find many odd-sized cranks running around
in production vehicles (or, would this be just YOUR luck Ed? :-). Get
the std's. and make sure you plastiguage them. They'll probably do the
job. Don't forget the thrust washers too and do a good job cleaning that
pick-up screen.

- -- 

Jim Brink
------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 00:11:46 -0800
From: "Richard Sheridan" 
Subject: doing a 22re rebuild, oppinions please...

	I have an '85 22re, I'm starting to tare down and rebuild, and am 
intrested in fining out what I can do to to bump up power and 
tourque, while maintaining reliability/durability.....you know, thing 
like putting in a 22returbo oil pump, cam (what kind) valves (oem or 
over sized), pistions/ rings (stock or aftermarket),bearings(Toyota 
or aftermarket), is it worth while balncing and porting or polishing? 
Is an engine oil cooler worth while, alternator / starter 
upgrades..... give me the goods guys, email me directly as well if 
you like 

------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 10:21:20 -0700
From: Chris Geiger 
Subject: Re: Engine woes- help!

I use colored wire ties, they are avaible in 10 different colors. After 
I use up the 10 colors I start using pairs like blue/green. I mark the 
hose and location it came from. That way when it time to put it back 
together I just match up the colors.

Chris Geiger 93 4Runner http://www.off-road.com/geiger

>  couldn't believe how many electrical wires, hoses, etc. there were
> to disconnect.  Does anyone have any ideas or hints of how to make sure
> I put it together correctly?




============================================================================
Toyota 4x4 page: http://www.off-road.com/4x4web/toyota

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 13:24:28 -0400
From: "Karl Bellve, Ph.D." 
Subject: Re: Engine woes- help!

JHansen@csw.L-3com.com wrote:
> 


 
> Well, the head gasket looked
> just fine to me and I couldn't see a crack in the head.  I didn't notice
> anything out of the ordinary in the oil.  I did notice that the #2
> cylinder has some green fluid in it (antifreeze?).  I couldn't find much
> of a cross hatch pattern in the cylinders but there wasn't much of a
> ridge.  This engine has 201,000 miles on it and after seeing how much
> work if was to take the head off and how much it will take to put it
> back together I am debating getting a new (remanufactered) engine, I
> don't want to be doing this again in the near future.  My other option

I would clean off both surfaces and put a new head gasket on it. Sounds
like the head gasket went around a water passenger into a cylinder. This
happened to me. I just put a new head gasket on and I am about 15,000
miles later, engine is still running fine. A $20 head gasket is much
cheaper than a used engine of unknown origin. You could resurface the
surfaces but this will require alot of work and time. The only thing I
would do is make sure the head is not warped (measure the diagonals)
before you put it back on.

- -- 


Cheers,

Karl Bellve, Ph.D.                   ICQ# 13956200
Biomedical Imaging Group               IM: kbellve 		
University of Massachusetts
Email: kdb@molmed.ummed.edu
Phone: (508) 856-6514
Fax:   (508) 856-1840

============================================================================
Toyota 4x4 page: http://www.off-road.com/4x4web/toyota

------------------------------


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 19:55:28 -0500 (US Eastern Standard Time)
From: "Ebersold, Chance J" 
Subject: Re: Engine woes- help!

I would send the head to a shop to get tested.  I thought 
everything was fine and put a new head gasket in my 22-re 
and it wouldn't start. Decided to send the head out and 
found out that it was warped.  It will save a big headache 
and it cost me $20 to get it checked so I think it is well 
worth it.
Chance

---------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 08:06:46 -0700 (PDT)
From: Dan Merrick 
Subject: Re: Putting 22re wires&hoses on correctly

Here's a few tricks i learned while pulling my brother's 22r and my 22r:
How to assemble all the wires and hoses: 

You should have started by using a video camera to take some footage of the
engine compartment before disassembling. I took nice, still footage of all
of the hoses that route from the fender to the intake, distributor, etc. If
you don't know where something goes, put the tape in the VCR and you have a
video of your wiring diagram. I know this trick is a little late for you,
since you have already started disassembly...

I also used masking tape and a permanent pen to label all of the hoses,
fittings, wires, and plugs. For example, before I would pull a vacuum hose
off a barbed fitting, I would take two small pieces of tape, write the
number "1" on each piece, then attach the tape to the hose and the barb as
soon as I pull them apart. There are some parts that the tape might not want
to stick to, so you may want to use something else (Chris G's colored zip
tie trick would work!) 

It also helps if you have a friend who has the same engine in his truck so
you can peek under his hood to verify any hose/wire routings. Otherwise get
a good manual or ask some of the listers to send you photocopies of vacuum
hose diagrams, wiring diagrams, etc. 

As far as the engine rebuild goes.. I would ask some local mechanics, auto
parts techs, etc. if they know of a reputable machine shop to overhaul your
engine. If I were you, I would do a little research into what parts to
replace, what brand parts to use, and then find a machinist who will do the
work. Having "your" old engine rebuilt by someone with a reputation and
using parts that have been recommended by Toyota fanatics is the best way to
go. Sometimes you don't know what you are getting with the remanufactured
engines. I have heard that ATK reman. engines are good though. The
warranties usually cover defects in parts and workmanship. But you have to
pull the motor and reinstall it(or pay someone else to do it). So I think
that a warranty is kinda useless, since removal and installation will cost
you about 2-4 days of work(assuming you are a 1 banana howler monkey!) Also,
it could take about a month for a good shop to rebuild your engine, since
good shops are always busy!

If you have a friend (or friends) who are more evolved howler monkeys, then
they hopefully can help you pull the engine, strip it down, and bring it to
the machine shop. Doing the removal and installation will offset the cost of
a good engine rebuild.

My brother's '82 22r was rebuilt for $1300, and still runs strong with about
40K on it. I ended up throwing a $800 junkyard motor in my '85, and it ran
great, until I sold it!

Dan


>	I posted a few weeks ago about my 22re engine (on an 88 4Runner) that
>overheated that I was told either had a blown head gasket or cracked
>head. 	

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Date: Fri, 25 Sep 1998 06:58:41 -0700
From: "ward" 
Subject: Re: Engine Woes

I recently went through the same thing,  Take the head to a machine shop
have them pressure check it (you can't magnaflux aluminium) and then
resuface it if needed (wich it will). It cost me $50. he took off .010"  I
put it back on with a new head gasket and did a compresion check and every
thing is fine.  Now, if I could only get that carb fixed............good
luck.   Mike  


============================================================================
Toyota 4x4 page: http://www.off-road.com/4x4web/toyota

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Date: Mon, 28 Sep 1998 15:59:47 -0500 (CDT)
From: Brian Wiencek 
Subject: Re: Question for the list: Japanese Used Engines.

> swap the whole engine with a Japanese one with 40K miles.
> 
> I called around and the quotes are around $600,
> I estimate $800 total with gaskets and misc.
> 
> A mechanic told me that there is no such thing as a
> 22RE in Japan, they only have an 18RE and a 24RE there.
> That the 22RE engines that they claim coming from Japan
> are actually from bone yards over here.

Personally I woud do the timing chain if your engine was not using much
oil, ran good, etc.  What I do know is that there is a size limit on most
of those japaneese engines, and I think it was like 2300 cc - so a 22R was
out- they have a 21R that some of the places are selling as a 22R
"equivalent" (they won't tell you the last part) - while it might be a
good idea for a 20R replacement, I would seriously consider the parts
availability here in the states, as well as emmissions (if anyone ever
'caught' that slight difference.  If it was me (and it will be soon with
over 230k and starting to use some oil) I'd be thinking of a complete
re-ring, new bearings, valve seals, and while I'm at it, checking the 
guides and valves, then lapping back in the valves.  Quality name brand
parts (Clevite 77 bearings, speed-pro rings, fel-pro gaskets, etc.) should
set me back around $150-200, add a new timing chain 'kit' ($100) and a
couple of bucks ($30-40) to have the block & head 'tanked', and possibly
the intake depending on how 'sludgy' it is, and the engine should be good
for another 150-200k.

- - Brian

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